Remodeling a bathroom takes time. It’s usually not a one-day affair unless you’re making the smallest of changes or additions. Drilling into the wall to install some storage or a towel rack won’t take more than an hour. Proper bathroom renovations Perth take up much more time.

A familiar adage is that, if no work is done on weekends, you’re looking at 23 days. How true is this, though? How accurate is this guess for bathroom renovations Perth timelines?

Let’s break it down and take a look. Keep in mind that the estimates assume nothing goes wrong.

First, if there’s demolition work, that’s tedious. That’s two days, most of the time. If you’re looking at a lot of materials or a more extensive renovation, that can go as long as four.

Carpentry can take another two days. If the underlying structure is in sound shape, you can get rid of this from your bathroom renovations Perth schedule.

Rough plumbing and electrical work can both take one to two days each. It’s usually best to assume two days, especially if you’re moving fixtures around. This is the rough-in stage, which means work stops short of the final connections.

The first inspection is a day’s worth of time. This period is movable, depending on when the inspector is available.

Insulation is half a day.

Drywall is three days in total. You can start this as soon as drywall is up, in fact. The finishing is what takes up time, adding things like joint compound, sanding, and drying.

Painting is a day’s worth of work. In a bare state, it’s swift – the drying is what takes time, though.

The final inspection is also about a day of work, for the average bathroom renovations Perth.

Tiling is two days, but it’s also optional. Flooring is also about the same amount of time. Depending on the material, you could even reduce it to about an afternoon.

Cabinet installation is also a day. Unless you’re going with extensive cabinetry in the bathroom, you’re going to not take too long in doing this work.

Hookups, fixtures, and the like can take anywhere from one to two days.

At this point, we’ve got nineteen and a half days. A little short of the 23 that’s being used as the standard. Fortunately, the remaining days can also be explained as a contingency. In any renovation, something will go wrong. The extra days are for covering these problems.